The Term

It is a diffused malaise, a spiritual pain that could be physical, is a dissatisfaction with oneself, a reproach from the deepest, is like a bite in the heart. Resentment occurs in comparison with others, by repressed and helplessly vindictive envy. Remorse is an individual, gives to his own conscience. Remorse is produced by the perception of having hurt or betrayed to another. In our time should be considered a strong rejection of guilt, for guilt, proclaiming an original innocence; but this feeling is reborn in another way in remorse masquerading as a malaise that can be called cultural. Although alone and come to think it is not responsible for any fault, or is the fault of society, or the constraints of the body etc. Remorse indicates a dysfunction accepted or not. The reality is that this feeling occurs more or less camouflaged, when there is a guilt objectively.

The term remorse is graphic because it expresses the pain of a bite inside, similar to how an animal wild to not loose your dam causing pain, though no death… We are reminded, in the mid 19th century, Manzoni left a fine psychological description of remorse in his characterization of the Ignominato, the Knight without name of I promessi sposi: already some time ago that their misdeeds caused you, if not remorse, at least some officious uneasiness. The many preserved agglomerated in his memory, rather that on his conscience, presented you vividly to commit a new evil, seeming extremely uncomfortable his memory, and overwhelming it your excessive number, as if each insomuch over his heart the previous weight. I already started to feel again that revulsion he experienced to commit early offences, and which expired later, it was no longer bothers him for many years. But if in earlier times the idea of an indefinite future and a long and vigorous life filled its mood of an unthinking confidence, now by the contrary, consideration of the future was that featured him nastier past.

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